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What do you think of the death penalty?
#1
Question 
It is felt and generally agreed that killing somebody is the worst crime imaginable. Then it becomes hard to understand how
it has followed that the appropriate punishment in some state, is to kill the killer. Many countries abolished the death penalty while some others still consider it to be a justifiable punishment.

Do you support the death penalty? Or do you think there’s maybe spiritual
reason why death penalty should be abolished across the whole world? I would
like to read your opinion.



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A meditation is a trip to the space between the sun and earth. Where there is No days no nights, no noise, no rain, no wind, no earth force of attraction, but just peace, just light, just silence, just freedom. Would you Join me in this trip?

M. Krya
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#2
Interrestingly, this subject might be related to the article about thoughforms which is in the following link:

http://www.myspiritualgroup.com/Thread-T...35#pid1735

I believe that death penalty is one of thos primitive customs of earlier human ways of life that has managed to survive up to now. It serves no meaningful purpose if looked from a higher perspective. And even by just observing the cultures where death penalty is systematically and mercilessly being applied (such as in the Islamic cultures for ex), one finds that there appear to be more and more violence and restlessness in those societies with each passing generation. So this alone should give reason to believe that killing an offender does not necessarily mean cleansing the society from the "evil" actions of that person.

The masses may be pleased that a certain person (or certain people) they judge as a serious offender(s) of their laws or way of life has been cut off from their midst and think this is justice, but what they do not realize is that the spirit of that person remains active even after the death of the body. And since the spirit has been set free from the confinement of the body, it will become even more powerful in its attempt to avenge itself by influencing (or possessing) as many living people as possible, and vicariously satisfying its repressed desires through them.

And sine a spirit cannot be stopped from achieving whatever ends it wishes, one can see why it is a lot more effective to punish an offender by keeping that person alive in his or her body until he/she amend all his/her wrongdoings, so that his or her spirit cannot harm a lot more people if the person was simply killed. As long as the person is still alive, there is still a chance that he/she may come to realize his wrongdoings, change his/her mindset and amend himself/herself in some way. This is a much better prospect than killing the person and letting his/her negative thoughtforms empowered by his/her spirit so it can continue to wreak havocks in other people's lives.

However, this doesn't mean we have to leave serious offenders free or let them go loose in society. The bottom line is that everyone must be held accountable for their actions. So IMO, if a person has committed a serious offence (such as murder for instance), it is better to put him in a situation where he/she cannot continue to harm other people and where the person will have the time to reflect on what he/she has done and realize his/her mistake. The purpose is to give that person the chance to reform himself/herself and amend his/her misdeed WHILE ALIVE. In some tribal societies, this punishment often involved banishing the person from the society so he/she can go wherever else he/she wanted, and this punishment was very much feared that it constituted an effective dissuasion to all potential future offenders. Let note that our current prisons are not ideal places for offenders to reform themselves because they often come out there in a worst state than when they entered, and many of them become recidivist offenders.

But even if the person dies in detention or exile without repenting or reforming himself/herself, at least the spirit of that person will have no reason to seek vengeance (sinece nobody has denied it the chance to change). It will now be left for the soul of that person to learn in the after-life what it has failed to learn while alive in this world and to come back down here in order to settle its karmic debt.
Mystery creates wonder. Wonder produces curiosity. Curiosity raises questions. Questions lead to answers.
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#3
I think it is not for us humain to punish. But to a higher kind of being to. We dont know how much people truly deserve as punishment.
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#4
I think they should be told about their Life Review at the end of their lifetime, and serve a sentence incarceration in prison.
Just knowing they will have to relive all the horrible things they did to others, by experiencing the pain and sorrow of their victims and their loved ones, as if it were their own should be enough to make them reflect on their deeds and change their ways.
Can you imagine the ones who behead their enemies reliving each beheading as if they were the one being beheaded?
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#5
Most of us who live in western societies, with a background of Christian awareness, and the possibility/certainty of an afterlife, abhor the death penalty, that’s for sure. However, we have a problem here. The prisons, in most western countries, are already seriously overcrowded, with little potential for character reform and rehabilitation, despite visits by clerics and ministers of various religious persuasions.
My experience of spiritualist divine services in European countries is that, within the proceedings, a ‘medium’ is invited to connect with the spirits of deceased persons, usually relatives or friends of a person in the congregation, and bring through communications, primarily to prove the existence of an after-life, but also to convey messages of love and encouragement. So, yes, incarceration, for the protection of the general public, but why not compulsory attendance at (say) weekly spiritualist services with at least one medium in attendance. Might this persuade some offenders to mend their ways? Could it work?
Not possible though. Compulsory exposure to religious ethos? Contrary to the human rights of the offender. But doesn’t the offender forfeit some of those so-called human rights by being such an offender? Does anyone know the rules? Are there any rules?
My limited knowledge of Islamism suggests that this would not be appropriate in that culture, where the above is wholly inapplicable.
I am a Spiritual Being having a Human Experience
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#6
What? No response on this thread for a week.
Why? Perhaps it is a subject no-one really likes to have to address.
Consider this: - If you were the one who had to make that final decision concerning the deliberate termination of a human life, then how say you? Thumbs up or thumbs down?
And don't give me any "it all depends on the circumstances." The jury said "Guilty as charged." The judge said "death by lethal injection." Face it.
So what is your decision?
I am a Spiritual Being having a Human Experience
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#7
Death penalty is primitive. It's the need for retaliation. Jurisdiction should be a means to change a person and bring him/her back in society whenever possible. When that's not possible, society should be protected from that person.
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#8
Thank you Anoesjka.
I take that as a 'thumbs up'
I am a Spiritual Being having a Human Experience
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#9
Oops, I know I can sound a bit confusing at times, but I'm definitely against the death penalty.
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#10
Just to un-confuse you,in the Roman gladiatorial arena, the spectators could signify whether a gladiator should live or die by showing 'thumbs up' let him live, or 'thumbs down' let him die. So you are confirmed as 'thumbs up'
I am a Spiritual Being having a Human Experience
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